GIA Research

Research is at the heart of everything GIA does. It informs gemstone grading reports, drives innovation in instrument development and fuels our education so that we can foster new generations of gemmologists. Most importantly, it helps us set industry standards that protect consumers across the globe.

GIA has been on the cutting edge of gemmological research since 1931, and now there is more to learn than ever. With the appearance of new gem sources and gemstone types and new treatment processes and synthetic gemstones, the public relies on GIA to know the identity and quality of the stones they love. Continued breakthroughs in research ensures the public’s trust in the gem industry and offers gem aficionados everywhere deeper insight into these marvels of nature. This page is your gateway to the discoveries and news in the research community and archived historical content.

An array of rough and polished colored gemstones sitting on a world map.

Publications


GIA lab scientists offer up their findings on some of the world’s most valued gems and their treatments.

See More
GIA Research

Publications

From the history of the Chivor emerald mine to the ancient craft of jade carving to insights into the causes of corundum colour, these articles combine science with art and history to provide a window into the fascinating and complex world of gemstones. Offering up the best and most current research by GIA lab scientists, all were published in GIA’s peer-reviewed academic journal, Gems & Gemology, or other professional journals.

Explore GIA Publications

An array of rough and polished colored gemstones sitting on a world map.

Read about the some of the world’s most valued gems and the identification of unusual gem treatments and rare gem materials.

Read More
Hands holding rough tsavorite in the field

Field Gemmology


GIA field gemmologists travel around the world to study new gem sources and collect research samples.

See More
GIA Research

Field Gemmology

GIA field gemmologists are globetrotters, travelling to all corners of the world to study new gem sources, such as Nasarawa aquamarine or Mozambican ruby. In the past decade, they’ve been on 95 expeditions to 21 countries, collecting more than 1 million carats of samples. 

Explore Field Gemmology Articles

Hands holding rough tsavorite in the field

Curious about artisanal mining, the conditions of gem formation or how gemmologists determine gemstone country of origin?

Read More
Researcher using a XRF spectrometer.

Scientific Equipment & Techniques

Learn about the GIA laboratory’s advanced instruments used to identify and evaluate stones.

See More
GIA Research

Scientific Equipment & Techniques

As new gems and gem localities are discovered and gem origin services become increasingly in demand — and as laboratory-grown stones and treated stones grow in popularity — gemmologists rely more and more on advanced instruments to identify and evaluate stones. From loupes and microscopes to laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, each instrument provides a piece of the puzzle on gemstone type, potential treatments and origin.

Learn about GIA's tools of the trade

Researcher using a XRF spectrometer.

GIA researchers, developers and innovators work each day to discover solutions for identifying complex gem materials and treatments.

Read More

Research that transforms and inspires

Placeholder Alt Text

Latest Research

CVD, HPHT and Natural Diamonds

Is There a Difference Between Natural and Laboratory-Grown Diamonds?

Read Article

Rough diamond, yellow in colour

Diamond Research Gives Clues to the Formation of the Continents

Read Article

A blue diamond with inclusions under the table is held up in tweezers.

Where Do Blue Diamonds Come From?

Blue Diamonds Have a Surprising “Superdeep” Origin and a Link to Ancient Oceans

Read Article

View All Recent Articles