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Ametrine

This transparent quartz has colors of both amethyst and citrine, and is called ametrine or amethyst-citrine.

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Golden Yellow

Golden shades of citrine glow in the heart of this gem.

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Lovely Purple

Shades of amethyst’s purple contrast with citrine’s orangy yellow.

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Blended shades

Reflections from the back facets blend into sunset colors in this rectangular cut.

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Bicolor

This quartz crystal shows both amethyst and citrine colors.

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Top Quality

This facet grade rough piece will produce a superb cut gem.

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Rare

With only one producing source, the supply of ametrine is very limited.

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Tools

Buyer's Guide

Ametrine is a bicolor gem that’s highly prized when it displays an attractive balance between its most desirable amethyst and citrine shades.

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What To Look For

Color

The striking bicolor nature of ametrine is its most important feature.

Ametrine Clarity
Most gem-quality ametrines do not have eye-visible inclusions.
Cut

Cutting styles that emphasize ametrine’s unique color combination are popular with consumers.

Carat Weight

Ametrine is available in a wide range of sizes. Generally, larger gems have the most intense colors.

Ametrine Quality Factors: The Comprehensive Guide