2020 Continuing Education Modules

The 2020 Continuing Education Recognition Program modules are now available. Complete all eight modules by December 31, 2020 in order to receive your Continuing Education Recognition Program participation acknowledgment.

Assignment 1 Release Date: 2/3/2020

Geographic Origin Determination

The jewelry trade has long put a premium on gems from certain locations, such as blue sapphire from Kashmir or ruby from Myanmar (Burma). Yet other localities produce stones that rival those from these revered sources. Whether it is fair or not, gems from renowned sources command the highest prices. For that reason, determining the geographic origin of a stone can mean the difference of hundreds or even thousands of dollars in value. This month, Shane McClure, Global Director of Colored Stone Services at GIA, discusses the challenges laboratories face when determining the geographic origin of various colored stones.

This is the first assignment in the 2020 Continuing Education Recognition Program. You will have continuous access to the entire course -- including the assignments, the GIA eLearning courses, and the multimedia archive -- until the end of the calendar year. Be sure to complete all eight assignments by December 31, 2020 in order to receive your Continuing Education Recognition Program certificate.

For more information about Geographic Origin Determination, see the Winter 2019 issue of Gems & Gemology: Geographic Origin Special Issue

Assignment 2 Release Date: 3/2/2020

GIA Field Gemology

An essential asset of GIA’s research department is its reference collection of gem samples from around the globe. Used by scientists to gain better a better understanding of geographic origins and treatments of gems, the collection has been built through the efforts of GIA’s field gemology department. The field gemology department was established in 2008 specifically to support GIA research. GIA field gemologists have conducted more than 95 field expeditions to six continents and collected over 22,000 samples. This month, GIA’s supervisor of field gemology, Wim Vertriest, discusses GIA’s classification system as well as the challenges of working in the field.

For more information about building a research collection, see theWinter 2019 issue of Gems & Gemology: Geographic Origin Special Issue.