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Showing 31 results for "red beryl"
Article
GIA Gem Project
Beryl

Chemically pure beryl is colorless, but trace elements give rise to green, blue and pink/red colors.

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Identification of the Endangered Pink-To-Red Stylaster Corals by Raman Spectroscopy

All corals within the Stylasteridae family (including the Stylaster genus) are listed in Appendix II of CITES.

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 Spinel 80909 300x169 Article
GIA Gem Project
Spinel

Found in nearly every color – most notably red, pink and blue – spinels are popular gemstones because of their abundance, moderate cost and attractiveness.

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Garnet Article
GIA Gem Project
Garnet

Often thought of as a deep red gemstone, garnet can also be yellow, orange, green or brown – any color except blue.

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Books: Smithsonian Nature Guide on Gems

A look at Smithsonian Nature Guide on Gems

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Hornbill Ivory

The author reviews the nature of this material and some of the forms into which it has been fashioned, as well as means of identifying hornbill ivory from other ivories and from imitations.

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Article
GIA Gem Project
Corundum

Ruby and sapphire (usually blue, but also in every other color) have been the most important colored gemstones for several thousand years. Originating historically in southeast and central Asia, and more recently in eastern Africa, these colored varieties of the mineral corundum have been much sought as gems because of their rarity, color and durability. Gem corundum can display asterism and chatoyancy due to the presence of oriented mineral inclusions, and in some cases, a change of color when viewed under different light sources.

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Article
GIA Gem Project
Corundum

Ruby and sapphire (usually blue, but also in every other color) have been the most important colored gemstones for several thousand years. Originating historically in southeast and central Asia, and more recently in eastern Africa, these colored varieties of the mineral corundum have been much sought as gems because of their rarity, color and durability. Gem corundum can display asterism and chatoyancy due to the presence of oriented mineral inclusions, and in some cases, a change of color when viewed under different light sources.

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Abstracts; Spring 2009

This article, from the Spring 2009 issue of Gems & Gemology, is a compilation of abstracts of important gemology-related articles published outside of Gems & Gemology.

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Abstract Header from the 2009 issue of Gems & Gemology
Abstracts; Winter 2009

This article, from the Winter 2009 issue of Gems & Gemology, is a compilation of abstracts of important gemology-related articles published outside of Gems & Gemology.

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