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Showing 37 results for "red beryl"
Gem Garnets in The Red-To-Violet Color Range

This article shows that the characteristic of color appears to have little correlation with variations in bulk (not trace) composition or physical properties.

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Treated-Color Pink-To-Red Diamonds from Lucent Diamonds Inc.

Using a multi-step process, Lucent Diamonds has developed a new treatment process for certain natural diamonds that creates colors from pink-purple through red to orangy brown.

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A heart-shaped piece of pink drusy hangs from a gold chain. Article
Dreamy Drusy: Minute Crystals Shimmer in Dramatic Designs

Drusy jewelry has surged in popularity in recent years. Celebrities wear it on the red carpet and designers clamor for it at gem shows.

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Pastel Pyropes
Pastel Pyropes

Pyrope garnets occur in near-colorless to light orange and pink, as well as the familiar red.

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An Update on Color in Gems. Part 1: Introduction and Colors Caused by Dispersed Metal Ions

This three-part series of articles reviews our current understanding of gemstone coloration.

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Books: Smithsonian Nature Guide on Gems

A look at Smithsonian Nature Guide on Gems

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Multi-colored gems are superimposed on an image of glacier peaks. Article
Gems and Minerals from the Subarctic

Circumnavigate the boreal reaches of the globe to explore gems from polar regions.

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Grayish blue aquamarine
Aquamarine with Unusually Strong Dichroism

This aquamarine's most striking feature was its unusually strong dichroism, displaying very deep blue and pale bluish green colors.

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Unveiling the Cat’s-Eye Effect in a 75 ct Colombian Emerald Pair

This article examines the mysteries of rough emerald cutting through a spectacular pair of cat's-eye emeralds from Colombia.

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An Update on Color in Gems. Part 3: Colors Caused by Band Gaps and Physical Phenomena

The final part of this series is concerned with colors explained by band theory, such as canary yellow diamonds, or by physical optics, such as play-of-color in opal.

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