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Micro-Features of Ruby
Inclusions in Natural, Synthetic, and Treated Ruby

Provides a visual guide to the internal features of natural, synthetic, and treated rubies.

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Synthetic Ruby Overgrowth on Natural Corundum
Article
Analysis of Synthetic Ruby Overgrowth on Corundum

Analysis of synthetic ruby overgrowth on corundum, using analysis of inclusions, UV-Vis-NIR and EDXRF spectroscopy, and LA-ICP-MS.

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73.69-mm-long Synthetic Ruby Crystal
Flame-Fusion Synthetic Ruby Boule with Flux Synthetic Ruby Overgrowth

This synthetic ruby specimen features two growth methods within the same crystal.

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Article
Summer 2015 G&G: Dual-Stars, Photomicrography Guide, Rubies from Tajikistan, New Micro-World Section

G&G Brief presents an overview of the content of the Summer 2015 issue of Gems & Gemology.

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Composite ruby rough
Unusual Composite Ruby Rough

In this composite, synthetic ruby rough attached to two natural ruby slabs was fashioned to imitate natural material.

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Article
Insights From Inclusions

Natural gemstones are typically far more valuable than synthetic ones, so being able to identify them correctly is a powerful skill.

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“Diffusion Ruby” Proves to be Synthetic Ruby Overgrowth on Natural Corundum

A relatively new production of red corundum, reportedly from Bangkok, has been offered for sale in recent years.

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Hydrothermal Synthetic Red Beryl from the Institute of Crystallography, Moscow

Hydrothermal synthetic red beryl has been produced for jewelry applications.

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Some Diagnostic Features of Russian Hydrothermal Synthetic Rubies and Sapphires

Most Russian hydrothermal synthetic rubies and pink, orange, green, blue, and violet sapphires—colored by chromium and/or nickel—reveal diagnostic zigzag or mosaic-like growth structures associated with color zoning.

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Separating Natural and Synthetic Rubies on the Basis of Trace-Element Chemistry

Natural and synthetic gem rubies can be separated on the basis of their trace-element chemistry.

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