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Blue Sapphires
Article
An In-Depth Gemological Study of Blue Sapphires from the Baw Mar Mine (Mogok, Myanmar)

GIA field gemologists visited Baw Mar operations in 2013, 2014, and 2015. In this study, we analyzed samples collected during two separate expeditions.

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Eight HPHT faceted synthetic diamonds from AOTC Group
Near-Colorless HPHT Synthetic Diamonds from AOTC Group

Presents the gemological and spectroscopic properties of a suite of synthetic diamonds grown by AOTC using high pressure and high temperature.

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Sapphire
Article
Sapphires from the Gem Rush Bemainty area, Ambatondrazaka (Madagascar)

The discovery of many fine quality sapphires in this area is opening a new chapter in the conflict between conservation and gem mining in northeastern Madagascar.

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Greenish yellow doublets.
Synthetic Sapphire and Synthetic Spinel Doublets

Unusual doublets created from two different synthetics are revealed at the Carlsbad laboratory.

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Fall 2016 Gems & Gemology Cover
Article
Fall 2016 G&G: CVD Synthetic Diamonds Survey, Reversible Color Change in Blue Zircon

A summary of the content found in the Fall 2016 issue of Gems & Gemology.

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Article
Summer 2015 G&G: Dual-Stars, Photomicrography Guide, Rubies from Tajikistan, New Micro-World Section

G&G Brief presents an overview of the content of the Summer 2015 issue of Gems & Gemology.

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This specimen was revealed to be a synthetic star sapphire.
Unusual Combination of Inclusions in Synthetic Star Sapphire

A hexagonal boundary, usually found in natural material, is observed in a synthetic star sapphire.

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Article
Insights From Inclusions

Natural gemstones are typically far more valuable than synthetic ones, so being able to identify them correctly is a powerful skill.

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SP13 LN Fig.21
Yellow Synthetic Sapphire Colored by Trapped-Hole Mechanism

A combination of trace-element analysis and UV-visible spectroscopy clearly indicated that the yellow color originated from the much more effective chromophore known as “trapped holes,” associated with the trace amount of Mg and Cr in this stone.

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The Separation of Natural from Synthetic Colorless Sapphire

Greater amounts of colorless sapphire—promoted primarily as diamond substitutes, but also as natural gemstones—have been seen in the gem market during the past decade.

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